Workshops

Homeownership

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Housing Justice: Community organizing, affordable housing and community design methods in Portland’s Las Adelitas development


Date: Tuesday, Oct. 20

Time: 9:00 am - 10:00 am PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Moderator:

Alex Salazar, Principal, Salazar Architects

Presenter:

Anna Gordon, Community Programs Manager, Verde
Ernesto Fonseca, CEO, Hacienda CDC

Description:
Las Adelitas is the outcome of a 5+ year community process in the Cully neighborhood of NE Portland that transforms a former strip club site known for human trafficking into a catalyst affordable housing / public plaza development with deep social, economic and environmental benefits. The work started as a commercial adaptive-reuse project but evolved over time into new construction focused on creating housing justice without displacement. The building also incorporates many sustainable features and is being planned with two innovations: a roof top Community Solar array serving the surrounding neighborhood and a new digital justice focused Electrical Vehicle program. Construction starts in Fall 2020. The three speakers will talk about the community organizing work that re-claimed the site, public policies and development processes, and the Community Design workshops with mostly immigrant Latinx and African families and that helped create the building.

Using the Community Reinvestment Act to Create Diverse and Affordable Oregon Communities


Date: Wednesday, Oct 14

Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Presenter:

Gerald Kellman, Senior Advisor for Organizing, National Community Reinvestment Coalition
Zo Amani, Community Reinvestment Act Coordinator, National Community Reinvestment Coalition

Description:
The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) has transformed economic life in the U.S. Before the act was created, people of color, and those who lived or owned property near communities of color could not get a mortgage, a small business loan or any other kind of credit. The CRA only remains strong if organizations understand it and make use of it. In Oregon, banks have one set up rules for private developers and another for nonprofits. They lend disproportionally to white people, the affluent and continue to reinforce inequalities of wealth. Restrictions on bank lending will keep nonprofit housing developers from building at a scale needed to address the need caused by gentrification and displacement. This session will introduce you to the Basics of the CRA, suggest points of engagement for your organization and invite you to more in-depth training and campaigns for economic equality, and affordable housing in Oregon.

Finding Resources to help Oregon’s Latino/Latina/Latinx overcome the impact of racism and poverty


Date: Thursday, Oct. 15

Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Presenters:

Gerald Kellman, Senior Advisor for Organizing, National Community Reinvestment Coalition
Zo Amani, Community Reinvestment Act Coordinator, National Community Reinvestment Coalition

Description:
Organizations that care about justice have a renewed focus on the deep and pervasive roots of racism experienced by African Americans. Oregon’s Latinx community, the state’s largest community of color, living in both rural and urban areas, has experienced a similar pattern of discrimination and inequity. This workshop will document the discrimination and discuss ways Latinx leadership can hold the private sector accountable, particularly financial institutions. We will discuss discrimination in small business and housing lending as well as the lack of corporate initiatives on behalf of Latinx communities. We will also explore disparities of wealth income and wages, work being done by Latinx led organizations to counteract the impact of racism and poverty, and strategies to increase partnerships between the private sector and Latinx nonprofit organizations. This workshop is part of a larger effort by NCRC to research and develop organizing and policy solutions to racial disparities in wealth.

Catalytic Land Cohort: Land banking as a tool for preventing displacement and increasing BIPOC affordable housing


Date: Wednesday, Oct 14

Time: 9:00 am - 10:00 am PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Moderator:

Diane Linn, Executive Director, Proud Ground

Presenters:

Brian Harper, Senior Regional Planner, Metro
Frank Alexander, Co-Founder & Senior Advisor, Center for Community Progress, Sam Nunn Professor of Law, Emeritus, Emory Law
Sharon Wade Ellis, Board member, Proud Ground and resident leader

Description:
Panel highlights the Catalytic Land Cohort, a 3-year initiative between Grounded Solutions Network and Center for Community Progress, as a strategy for promoting housing with lasting affordability at scale by leveraging land and philanthropic support in three focus cities. The Portland Cohort is led by Proud Ground, in partnership with Metro and resident leaders. Panelists will also speak to lessons learned in Atlanta and Houston, two cities where similar cohorts are a few years ahead. The project theme is centered around the experience of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color to identify housing needs, collaborate on solutions to further inclusive growth in the Portland area. Second, the project will identify and evaluate potential strategies to increase land ownership to develop lasting affordable housing at a scale that is both efficient and sufficient to meet the needs of Portland regional residents, specifically BIPOC communities.

Addressing Racial Disparities in Home Ownership: Moving from Promises to Action


Date: Friday, Oct 16

Time: 10:30 am - 11:30 am PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Moderator:

Chelsea Bunch, Housing Integrator, Oregon Housing and Community Services

Presenter:

Senator James Manning Jr., Co-Chair Task Force on Addressing Racial Disparities in Home Ownership
Steve Messinetti, President and CEO, Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East
Kimberly Horner, Executive Director, Portland Community Reinvestment Inc.

Description:
The Black Lives Matters movement is demanding reforms for racial justice. Homeownership for the BIPOC community is a key strategy for housing stabilization and generational wealth generation. Learn about the recommendations from the Oregon Legislative Task Force on Addressing Racial Disparities in Home Ownership to modify practices and procedures for mortgage loan applications and approvals to eliminate any impermissible discrimination or barriers. Second, learn about recommendations from Partners for Affordable Homeownership (PAH) to build an internal culture within the City of Portland to prioritize BIPOC homeownership. Join this discussion with leaders from the Task Force and PAH to learn how we can help support and advance BIPOC homeownership rates in Oregon.

HB 2001/2003: Building working relationships and holding cities accountable to develop affordable housing needs of residents


Date: Tuesday, Oct 13

Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PDT

Venue: Zoom link will be provided through registration system prior to event

Moderator:

Kim Travis, Housing Integrator, Oregon Housing and Community Services

Presenter:

Andrée Tremoulet, PhD, Principal, Commonworks Consulting
Ethan Stuckmayer, Senior Planner of Housing Programs, Dept. of Land Conservation and Development
Shannon Vilhauer, Executive Director, Habitat for Humanity of Oregon
Lynne McConnell, Affordable Housing Manager, City of Bend

Description:
Join a discussion with local government and affordable housing leaders to consider strategies to ensure House bills 2001 and 2003 fulfill their goal to provide Oregonians with more housing choices, especially middle housing people can afford appropriate to different stages of their lives. How do we foster productive partnerships between community and local governments resulting in concrete wins for residents? HB 2001 lets people build certain traditional housing types, like duplexes, formerly outlawed in single family residential zones. HB 2003 requires Oregon's medium and large cities over 10,000 people to study the future housing needs of their residents. The Department of Land Conservation and Development is completing the rulemaking phase for how they will direct municipalities to develop their unique housing production strategies. Portland’s City Council just approved deeper affordability options allowing up to six-plex developments in formerly single-family zones.